The Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice is delivered fully online through a partnership with USG eMajor in collaboration with other University System of Georgia schools. Housed in the Department of Civic Engineering and Public Service in UWG's University College, the program provides a true interdisciplinary opportunity. The degree allows for a large amount of student personalization through ample elective credits, as well as the possibility of credit for prior learning gained through various sources such as professional experiences, the military, training, community work, and personal study. eMajor online programs are ideal not only for traditional students who wish to take advantage of online course delivery, but also for working professionals, military members, transfer students and others seeking alternative routes to degree completion.

  • Overview

    BS in Criminal Justice Program Sheet (General)
    BS in Criminal Justice Program Sheet (Law Enforcement Concentration)
    BS in Criminal Justice Program Sheet (Social Justice Concentration)

    Program Location

    Online

    Method of Delivery

    Fully Online Only

    Accreditation

    The University of West Georgia is accredited by The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC).

    Credit and transfer

    Total semester hours required: 120
    Maximum Hours Transferable into program: 90
    A transfer credit evaluation will be completed by the UWG Transfer Team (transfer@westga.edu). Course application to a program is subject to review by the department.

  • Cost

    $199 per credit hour

    Please check the eMajor fee listings (PDF) on the Bursar's web site.

    This program is offered entirely online. Though a student may choose to sign-up for a face-to-face elective or core course, one can earn this degree completely online.

    Save money

    UWG is often ranked as one of the most affordable accredited university of its kind, regardless of the method of delivery chosen. In addition, online courses and programs can mean a huge cost-savings in many non-evident ways: No more high gas charges. No childcare needed. The flexibility can allow one to maintain a job while attending school. Regardless of state residency, out-of-state non-resident students are not charged non-resident tuition for online course credit hours.

    Details
    • Total tuition costs and fees may vary, depending on the instructional method of the courses in which the student chooses to enroll.
    • The more courses a student takes in a single term, the more they will typically save in fees and total cost.
    • Face-to-Face or partially online courses are charged at the general tuition rate and all mandatory campus fees, based on the student's residency (non-residents are charged at a higher rate).
    • Fully or entirely online course tuition rates and fees my vary depending on the program. Students enrolled in exclusively online courses do not pay non-Resident rates.
    • Together this means that GA residents pay about the same if they take all face-to-face or partially online courses as they do if they take only fully online courses exclusively; while non-residents save money by taking fully online courses.
    • One word of caution: If a student takes a combination of face-to-face and online courses in a single term, they will pay both all mandatory campus fees and the higher eTuition rate.
    • For the cost information, as well as payment deadlines, see the Student Accounts and Billing Services website

    There are a variety of financial assistance options for students, including scholarships and work study programs. Visit the Office of Financial Aid's website for more information.

                    

    This program is offered entirely online. Though a student may choose to sign-up for a face-to-face elective or core course, one can earn this degree completely online.

    Save money

    UWG is often ranked as one of the most affordable accredited university of its kind, regardless of the method of delivery chosen. In addition, online courses and programs can mean a huge cost-savings in many non-evident ways: No more high gas charges. No childcare needed. The flexibility can allow one to maintain a job while attending school. Regardless of state residency, out-of-state non-resident students are not charged non-resident tuition for online course credit hours.

    Details

    • Total tuition costs and fees may vary, depending on the instructional method of the courses in which the student chooses to enroll.
    • The more courses a student takes in a single term, the more they will typically save in fees and total cost.
    • Face-to-Face or partially online courses are charged at the general tuition rate and all mandatory campus fees, based on the student's residency (non-residents are charged at a higher rate).
    • Fully or entirely online course tuition rates and fees my vary depending on the program. Students enrolled in exclusively online courses do not pay non-Resident rates.
    • Together this means that GA residents pay about the same if they take all face-to-face or partially online courses as they do if they take only fully online courses exclusively; while non-residents save money by taking fully online courses.
    • One word of caution: If a student takes a combination of face-to-face and online courses in a single term, they will pay both all mandatory campus fees and the higher eTuition rate.
    • For the cost information, as well as payment deadlines, see the Student Accounts and Billing Services website

    There are a variety of financial assistance options for students, including scholarships and work study programs. Visit the Office of Financial Aid's website for more information.

  • Courses

    Coursework

    The University of West Georgia offers two concentrations in Criminal Justice:

    The Social Justice Concentration
    Courses in the social justice degree concentration in the criminal justice degree program will provide appropriate frameworks and tools to assist students in analyzing complex issues and promoting social change. A concentration in social justice will prepare students to be the leaders of a paradigm shift and promote social equity change in law enforcement, the judicial system, the healthcare industry, and economics.

    The Law Enforcement Concentration
    The criminal justice degree with a concentration in law enforcement is tailored to those students who already know they want a career in law enforcement. This degree program provides students with the knowledge of fair and ethical police practices, investigative skills in a variety of specialties, crime control and prevention techniques, and leadership skills. Students already employed in law enforcement will find this degree program will supplement and enhance their current knowledge, skills, and abilities. The B.S. in Criminal Justice will also assist current officers in obtaining promotions and leadership opportunities that can influence current and future generations of law enforcement officers.

    BS in Criminal Justice Program Sheet (General)
    BS in Criminal Justice Program Sheet (Law Enforcement Concentration)
    BS in Criminal Justice Program Sheet (Social Justice Concentration)

    Law Enforcement Concentration

    Choose 10 courses from the ones below:

    • CRJU-3350 - Drugs in America

      Explores and analyzes the complex experience of illicit drug use in America from multiple angles with specific attention to the ways that our culture understands drugs, drug use, and drug policy as a social/criminal justice problem. Topics include punishment, interdiction, prevention, and or rehabilitation.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • CRJU-3400 - Juvenile Deliquency & Justice

      Reviews the juvenile justice system, including the impact of Supreme Court decisions, and examines the theories of juvenile delinquency and the implication of those theories for preventing and controlling juvenile deviance.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • CRJU-3500 - Criminal Investigation

      An overview of principles, techniques, law and procedure involved in the criminal investigative process from its inception to culmination.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • CRJU-3501 - Criminal Investigation II

      Continues information introduced in CRJU 3500, with special focus on the investigation of the crimes of burglary, robbery, forgery, homicide, assault, and bombings. Providing testimony in court, assessing modus operandi, and developing personality profiles will also be examined, as well as obtaining fingerprints and other types of latent evidence.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • CRJU-3600 - Criminal Justice Admin

      Introduction to criminal justice management theory, practice, and policy. This course includes a review of traditional schools or organizational theory, including bureaucracy, scientific management, human relations, and the behavioral approach, with particular emphasis on how each applies to criminal justice agencies.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • CRJU-3710 - Special Topics in Criminal Justice

      An intensive study of a specific topic relevant to criminal justice, including sex crimes, terrorism, drug law, or capital punishment. This course may be taken three times for a total of nine credit hours when topics vary.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • CRJU-3800 - Race, Ethnicity & Criminal Justice

      Addresses the racial impact of criminal laws enacted by the people's elected representatives, the actions and policies of law enforcement agencies, the courts, correctional institutions, the juvenile justice system, and the death penalty. Raises awareness and promotes critical thinking about the problems that exist in our system, how those problems originated and evolved, and possible solutions for these problems.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • CRJU-3810 - Victimology

      Addresses the physical, emotional, and financial impact of crime victimization; the relationship between victims and offenders; how the criminal justice systems interacts with crime victims; and the policies designed by the government to offer assistance to individuals who are victimized by crime. Raises awareness and promotes critical thinking and problem solving about the most effective strategies for interaction with crime victims, the measurement of crime victimization, and victim trends.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • CRJU-4110 - The Law of Criminal Evidence

      An examination of the rules evidence used in criminal prosecutions, including burden of proof, presumptions, inferences and stipulation, relevancy of evidence and competency of witness, expert testimony, hearsay, and constitutional limitations.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • CRJU-4200 - Profiling the Serial Offender

      An examination of the type and patterns of crimes committed by serial offenders and the process by which profiles are developed to solve these crimes. This course is designed for those students interested in developing the insight necessary to understand serial criminal offending. Students will learn why studying serial offenders is important, the history of crime profiling, and the process associated with developing a criminal profile. Students will also be exposed to theoretical perspectives that help explain how one becomes a serial offender, and the various types of serial offenders (e.g., serial killers, mass murderers, cult killers, rapist, stalkers, etc.). Students will learn about the various offender typologies and will analyze actual cases throughout the course.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • CRJU-4210 - Terrorism and the Criminal Justice System

      An examination of the motives and actions of terrorist, the governmental response to terrorism, especially in the wake of 9/11, and the legal and constitutional restraints on the government. Included will be issues such as surveillance of American citizens, detention of suspected terrorists, enemy combatants, limits on the methods of interrogation, and use if military tribunals.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • CRJU-4300 - Community Corrections

      An examination of alternatives to incarceration. Special emphasis will be given to the issues of probation and parole, as well as diversion, community service, electronic monitoring, and various treatment programs.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • CRJU-4350 - Family Violence

      Explores a range of crimes that occur in the family setting, including violence between intimate partners, child abuse, and neglect. Theoretical factors, as well as how the criminal justice system responds to both victims and perpetrators of family violence, will be examined.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • CRJU-4600 - Police Problems and Practices

      An advanced examination of policing, exploring topics including the police subculture, the police use of discretion, the broken-windows approach, community policing, and problem-solving approaches.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    Major Required

    This degree requires 120 total credit hours (each course is 3 credit hours) CORE: 60 HOURS - As part of the 60 hours of Core courses required, the Area F Core Courses for all concentrations within the BS in Criminal Justice includes 18 credit hours required as follows: CRJU 1100 CRJU 2100 CRJU 2200 SPAN 1001 Choose 2: COMM 1100, PHIL 2020, POLS 2201, SOCI 1160, SPAN 2034 MAJOR/ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS: 60 HOURS for all concentrations includes 21 hours in the Major Core: CRJU 3100 CRJU 3110 CRJU 3200 CRJU 3300 CRJU 3700 CRJU 4700 CRJU 4800

    • CRJU-1100 - Intro To Criminal Justice

      An introduction to the structure, functions, and operations of criminal justice agencies including the police, the courts and corrections. An extended course description is as states: An overview of the criminal justice system, its philosophy and history of its three major components: police, courts, corrections. A broad- based interdisciplinary analysis of the problems and needs of agencies involved in the criminal justice process; and introduction to theories of crime; and a survey of professional career opportunities for criminal justice.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • CRJU-2100 - Introduction to Law Enforcement

      This course is an introduction to the study of law enforcement. This semester, we will examine the origins of and changes in the field of law enforcement. We will discuss contemporary policing practices and future challenges for police departments. Finally, we will consider the reciprocal relationship between police forces and the larger society.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • CRJU-3100 - Criminal Law

      Offers an overview of both substantive and procedural law related to the definitions, investigations, processing, and punishment of crimes. The course will introduce students to the legal idea of criminal responsibility, the concept and elements of criminal responsibility, required state of mind (mens rea), and prohibited conduct (actus reus). The course discusses the substantive content, structure, and sources of major crimes against persons and property and provides a comprehensive evaluation of various legal defenses to criminal liability under both common law (case law) and statutory law (legislative law) approaches.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • CRJU-3110 - Criminal Procedure

      A study of the nature and function of the law regulating the criminal processes, policies, and procedures in the administration of criminal justice. Special attention will be given to United States Supreme decisions.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • CRJU-3300 - Corrections

      A study of the history, structure, and functions of corrections as well as the legal and philosophical basis for the punishment of criminal offenders.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • CRJU-3700 - Criminal Justice Research Methodology

      An introduction to criminal justice research methodologies, with a focus on research design, ethical concerns, conceptualization, sampling, data analysis, interpretation of research results, report writing, and application of research findings.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • CRJU-4700 - Ethical Issues in Crim Justice

      An examination of the philosophical theories underlying ethics and how they relate to issues involving the police, courts, corrections, law, and principles of justice.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • CRJU-4800 - Senior Capstone

      Serves as the comprehensive experience in criminal justice utilizing the student's knowledge and academic skills, including pursuing archival research, journal keeping, note taking and report writing to address a topic or issue of contemporary interest in criminal justice or one of its sub-fields. The course will be taught at the senior level and will focus on criminal justice issues at the national and international levels. In addition to the course requirements, students will complete a major research paper that results in an end-of-semester presentation to the class. This course serves as a capstone course for criminal justice majors.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    Major Selects

    For the Law Enforcement Concentration select 3 courses from the ones below; for the Social Justice select 9 courses; for General select 13 courses.

    • CRJU-3250 - Crime and the Media

      This course analyzes the role the mass media has on human behavior; subsequently affecting human judgement, attitudes, perceptions of crime, and societal reactions to crime in general. This course analyzes how the general public processes the “criminal event” and other pertinent information regarding crime; and how this process is fundamentally derived from the media and an instrumental element in the creation of “fear of crime”. A fundamental question we will address this semester is: whether the mass media plays a significant role in the interpretation if criminality and our criminal justice system.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • CRJU-3350 - Drugs in America

      Explores and analyzes the complex experience of illicit drug use in America from multiple angles with specific attention to the ways that our culture understands drugs, drug use, and drug policy as a social/criminal justice problem. Topics include punishment, interdiction, prevention, and or rehabilitation.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • CRJU-3400 - Juvenile Deliquency & Justice

      Reviews the juvenile justice system, including the impact of Supreme Court decisions, and examines the theories of juvenile delinquency and the implication of those theories for preventing and controlling juvenile deviance.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • CRJU-3500 - Criminal Investigation

      An overview of principles, techniques, law and procedure involved in the criminal investigative process from its inception to culmination.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • CRJU-3501 - Criminal Investigation II

      Continues information introduced in CRJU 3500, with special focus on the investigation of the crimes of burglary, robbery, forgery, homicide, assault, and bombings. Providing testimony in court, assessing modus operandi, and developing personality profiles will also be examined, as well as obtaining fingerprints and other types of latent evidence.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • CRJU-3600 - Criminal Justice Admin

      Introduction to criminal justice management theory, practice, and policy. This course includes a review of traditional schools or organizational theory, including bureaucracy, scientific management, human relations, and the behavioral approach, with particular emphasis on how each applies to criminal justice agencies.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • CRJU-3710 - Special Topics in Criminal Justice

      An intensive study of a specific topic relevant to criminal justice, including sex crimes, terrorism, drug law, or capital punishment. This course may be taken three times for a total of nine credit hours when topics vary.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • CRJU-3800 - Race, Ethnicity & Criminal Justice

      Addresses the racial impact of criminal laws enacted by the people's elected representatives, the actions and policies of law enforcement agencies, the courts, correctional institutions, the juvenile justice system, and the death penalty. Raises awareness and promotes critical thinking about the problems that exist in our system, how those problems originated and evolved, and possible solutions for these problems.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • CRJU-3810 - Victimology

      Addresses the physical, emotional, and financial impact of crime victimization; the relationship between victims and offenders; how the criminal justice systems interacts with crime victims; and the policies designed by the government to offer assistance to individuals who are victimized by crime. Raises awareness and promotes critical thinking and problem solving about the most effective strategies for interaction with crime victims, the measurement of crime victimization, and victim trends.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • CRJU-4000 - Internship in Criminal Justice

      Supervised, practical experience in an appropriate criminal justice agency. This course allows students the opportunity to discover the integration between theory and practice. This course may be taken three times for a total of nine hours of credit.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • CRJU-4110 - The Law of Criminal Evidence

      An examination of the rules evidence used in criminal prosecutions, including burden of proof, presumptions, inferences and stipulation, relevancy of evidence and competency of witness, expert testimony, hearsay, and constitutional limitations.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • CRJU-4200 - Profiling the Serial Offender

      An examination of the type and patterns of crimes committed by serial offenders and the process by which profiles are developed to solve these crimes. This course is designed for those students interested in developing the insight necessary to understand serial criminal offending. Students will learn why studying serial offenders is important, the history of crime profiling, and the process associated with developing a criminal profile. Students will also be exposed to theoretical perspectives that help explain how one becomes a serial offender, and the various types of serial offenders (e.g., serial killers, mass murderers, cult killers, rapist, stalkers, etc.). Students will learn about the various offender typologies and will analyze actual cases throughout the course.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • CRJU-4210 - Terrorism and the Criminal Justice System

      An examination of the motives and actions of terrorist, the governmental response to terrorism, especially in the wake of 9/11, and the legal and constitutional restraints on the government. Included will be issues such as surveillance of American citizens, detention of suspected terrorists, enemy combatants, limits on the methods of interrogation, and use if military tribunals.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • CRJU-4300 - Community Corrections

      An examination of alternatives to incarceration. Special emphasis will be given to the issues of probation and parole, as well as diversion, community service, electronic monitoring, and various treatment programs.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • CRJU-4350 - Family Violence

      Explores a range of crimes that occur in the family setting, including violence between intimate partners, child abuse, and neglect. Theoretical factors, as well as how the criminal justice system responds to both victims and perpetrators of family violence, will be examined.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • CRJU-4500 - Management of Forensics

      The scientific investigation of crime with emphasis on the collection, analysis, comparison, and identification of physical evidence.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • CRJU-4600 - Police Problems and Practices

      An advanced examination of policing, exploring topics including the police subculture, the police use of discretion, the broken-windows approach, community policing, and problem-solving approaches.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • POLS-3100 - Constitutional Law

      Offers a comprehensive study of American constitutional law focusing on civil rights, civil liberties, and equal protection. Constitutional claims examined include the denial of freedoms under the Bill of Rights, the equal protection of laws under the 14th Amendment, and civil rights legislation enacted by Congress since the Civil War. The course will also focus on the application and interpretation of the constitutional protections by the American courts.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • PSYC-3850 - Forensic Psychology

      Examines the relationship between psychology and law, focusing on the roles of psychologists in legal settings. Focuses on the applicability of various psychological theories to criminal justice processes. Topics include competence evaluations, rehabilitation potential, accuracy of eyewitness testimony, the psychology of jury selection, bystander apathy, the insanity defense, and the effectiveness of the polygraph, among others.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • SJUS-3000 - Introduction to Social Justice

      This course will introduce the student to the concept of social justice and social change. Examines various social justice theories such as restorative and distributive justice, postmodernism, feminism, and others. Theorists include Rawls, Mills, Kant, and others. A review of institutional systems and how social change occurs within the institutional framework.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • SJUS-3050 - Politics of Social Justice

      This course examines selected contemporary issues of social justice at the national, state, and local level of politics in the United States. This course analyzes various social justice issues through an economic, demographic, institutional, and political lens. Course topics include a critical analysis of governance, criminal law, economic development, immigration, poverty and race, drugs, and social equity.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • SJUS-4000 - Social Justice Culture

      This course examines the relationship between music, art, movies & television, and social justice in the United States. These mediums bring people together, challenge the status quo, and shine a light on what is happening in various communities. This course will explore a range of music, art, movies, and television that reflect and influence social justice issues.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • SJUS-4050 - Law and Social Justice

      This course analyzes the relationship between legal institutions, inequality, and the ability of social groups to produce fundamental social change.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • SJUS-4800 - Social Justice Policy Analysis

      This course provides students with the tools to analyze policy implementation and effectiveness in the criminal justice system. Policies are evaluated in the areas of policing, corrections, courts, and criminal justice. Research methods and case study analysis will be used to evaluate and inform the creation of crime-related policies

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    Social Justice Concentration

    Choose 4 courses from the ones below:

    • SJUS-3000 - Introduction to Social Justice

      This course will introduce the student to the concept of social justice and social change. Examines various social justice theories such as restorative and distributive justice, postmodernism, feminism, and others. Theorists include Rawls, Mills, Kant, and others. A review of institutional systems and how social change occurs within the institutional framework.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • SJUS-3050 - Politics of Social Justice

      This course examines selected contemporary issues of social justice at the national, state, and local level of politics in the United States. This course analyzes various social justice issues through an economic, demographic, institutional, and political lens. Course topics include a critical analysis of governance, criminal law, economic development, immigration, poverty and race, drugs, and social equity.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • SJUS-4000 - Social Justice Culture

      This course examines the relationship between music, art, movies & television, and social justice in the United States. These mediums bring people together, challenge the status quo, and shine a light on what is happening in various communities. This course will explore a range of music, art, movies, and television that reflect and influence social justice issues.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • SJUS-4050 - Law and Social Justice

      This course analyzes the relationship between legal institutions, inequality, and the ability of social groups to produce fundamental social change.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • SJUS-4800 - Social Justice Policy Analysis

      This course provides students with the tools to analyze policy implementation and effectiveness in the criminal justice system. Policies are evaluated in the areas of policing, corrections, courts, and criminal justice. Research methods and case study analysis will be used to evaluate and inform the creation of crime-related policies

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

  • Faculty
  • Admissions

    Guidelines for Admittance

    Enrolling in an eMajor Program

    1. Before you can register for an eMajor class at UWG, you must be an admitted student. If you are not a current student at UWG, your first step is to apply for admission.

      A minimum GPA or amount of credit hours is NOT required in order to declare the major.

    2. Take the eMajor Introduction Quiz. All students are required to complete the introduction quiz before registering for an eMajor course. You must know your UWG student ID number as well as your UWG email address to complete the quiz.
    3. You will receive an email from the UWG eMajor liaison within 48 hours of completing the introduction quiz, which will include instructions on how to register for an eMajor class.
                    

    Program Specific Admittance Guidelines

    Application Deadlines

    General admissions deadlines are typically:

    • Fall - June 1
    • Spring - Nov 15
    • Summer - May 15

    * Application, app fee, and document deadline; Dates may vary for Readmit, Transfer, and Transient students.
    See The Scoop for more specific deadlines

                  

    Application Deadlines

    General admissions deadlines are typically:

    • Fall - June 1
    • Spring - Nov 15
    • Summer - May 15

    * Application, app fee, and document deadline; Dates may vary for Readmit, Transfer, and Transient students.
    See The Scoop for more specific deadlines

                      

    Admission Process Checklist

    Complete the online application.

    Submit $40 non-refundable application fee.

    Submit official documents: Request all official transcripts and test scores be sent directly to UWG from all colleges or universities attended. If a transcript is mailed to you, it cannot be treated as official if it has been opened. Save time by requesting transcripts be sent electronically. All official documents should be sent to:

    University of West Georgia
    Office of Admissions
    1601 Maple Street
    Carrollton, GA 30118

    Submit Certificate of Immunization, if required. Students attending UWG solely online may qualify for a term-by-term exemption. See the UWG Immunization Policy for more information.               

    Contact

    Office of Admissions
    678-839-5600
    admiss@westga.edu

    eMajor Instructional Program Lead
    Dr. Dave Ayers
    BS in Criminal Justice
    (678) 839-3783
    dayers@westga.edu              

  • Dates

    Please see the eMajor Academic Calendar for specific dates through the semester.                

  • Objectives
    Upon completion of the Bachelor of Science with a Major in Criminal Justice, students will demonstrate: